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  • Received: Oct. 12, 2020

    Accepted: Dec. 11, 2020

    Posted: Jan. 15, 2021

    Published Online: Jan. 15, 2021

    The Author Email: Liu Chao (cliu347-c@my.cityu.edu.hk), Chen Jiangbo (jchen347-c@my.cityu.edu.hk), Zhang Yachao (yaczhang3-c@my.cityu.edu.hk), Zhu Jingyi (jy.zhu@my.cityu.edu.hk), Wang Lidai (lidawang@cityu.edu.hk)

    DOI: 10.1117/1.AP.3.1.016002

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    Chao Liu, Jiangbo Chen, Yachao Zhang, Jingyi Zhu, Lidai Wang. Five-wavelength optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy of blood and lymphatic vessels[J]. Advanced Photonics, 2021, 3(1): 016002

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Advanced Photonics, Vol. 3, Issue 1, 016002 (2021)

Five-wavelength optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy of blood and lymphatic vessels

Chao Liu1,2, Jiangbo Chen1,2, Yachao Zhang1,2, Jingyi Zhu1,2, and Lidai Wang1,2,*

Author Affiliations

  • 1City University of Hong Kong, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR, China
  • 2City University of Hong Kong, Shenzhen Research Institute, Shenzhen, China

Abstract

Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) has been developed for anatomical, functional, and molecular imaging but usually requires multiple scanning for different contrasts. We present five-wavelength OR-PAM for simultaneous imaging of hemoglobin concentration, oxygen saturation, blood flow speed, and lymphatic vessels in single raster scanning. We develop a five-wavelength pulsed laser via stimulated Raman scattering. The five pulsed wavelengths, i.e., 532, 545, 558, 570, and 620 / 640 nm, are temporally separated by several hundreds of nanoseconds via different optical delays in fiber. Five photoacoustic images at these wavelengths are simultaneously acquired in a single scanning. The 532- and 620 / 640-nm wavelengths are used to image the blood vessels and dye-labeled lymphatic vessels. The blood flow speed is measured by a dual-pulse method. The oxygen saturation is calculated and compensated for by the Grüneisen-relaxation effect. In vivo imaging of hemoglobin concentration, oxygen saturation, blood flow speed, and lymphatic vessels is demonstrated in preclinical applications of cancer detection, lymphatic clearance monitoring, and functional brain imaging.

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